2018-2019 Annual Appeal Campaign. Cowichan Hospice House Project.

Our health care system is designed to provide acute and complex care to patients who will, with that care, improve and get better. There is no system to deliver end-of-life care within our current hospital environment. Cowichan Hospice House will deliver that care.

Please donate today to help us improve hospice care in the Cowichan Valley.

Your donation will help build Cowichan Hospice House.

Donate Now

Community Matching Campaign

We all deserve to die with privacy, dignity & respect.

Denise McKinlay

Hospitals are designed to cure sickness and injury and to bring new life into the world. They are not designed to support people at the end of their life.

We try to support patients who wish to die in their own home, but sometimes it isn’t possible. They may have complex care needs that we can’t manage at home, or they may lack a family support network. Currently, our region only has three end-of-life beds and only one which can support complex care needs.

Our hospital is over capacity and our staff struggle to provide private and dignified spaces for patients in their last moments. Patients may die in shared rooms with 1-3 other patients. Sometimes they may be moved into a coffee room if it is the only private space available. It is often difficult to accommodate visits from larger families.

A hospice house is a place where people and their families can be supported with love, dignity and appropriate medical care. The new facility will offer seven hospice beds, with capacity for three more.

Dr. Valorie Masuda

Palliative Care Doctor, Cowichan District Hospital

Hospitals are designed to cure sickness and injury and to bring new life into the world. They are not designed to support people at the end of their life.

We try to support patients who wish to die in their own home, but sometimes it isn’t possible. They may have complex care needs that we can’t manage at home, or they may lack a family support network. Currently, our region only has three end-of-life beds and only one which 
can support complex care needs.

Our hospital is over capacity and our staff struggle to provide private and dignified spaces for patients in their last moments. Patients may die in shared rooms with 1-3 other patients. Sometimes they may be moved into a coffee room if it is the only private space available. It is often difficult to accommodate visits from larger families.

A hospice house is a place where people and their families can be supported with love, dignity and appropriate medical care. The new facility will offer seven hospice beds, with capacity for three more.

Darin Lashman

My mom passed away in 1999 when I was 22 years old. She spent the last month of her life at Cowichan District Hospital. Some of this time was spent in a shared room.

Very few private rooms exist. Having privacy would have definitely put both my mom and my family at ease. I know that we were all uncomfortable having some of our last conversations in a shared environment.

A dedicated hospice facility would have given my mom the proper end-of-life care; the care, dignity and respect that she deserved.

Nina, Mila and Heidi Padjen

Our mother Cindy passed away in July of 2016. You never think you are going to be faced with making decisions about death or dying and even need hospice until it actually happens.

Our mother did not want to be placed in the hospital and we wanted to honour her wishes. Fortunately, Nina is a Registered Nurse who had the skill and expertise to care for our mother.

We all would have slept better knowing that our mother’s needs would have been met in a designated hospice facility with staff that are trained specifically with a focus on palliative care. A hospice facility would have also provided Nina with the option to focus on her relationship with our mother instead of that of a caregiver.

Having a dedicated hospice facility is a very positive move for our community. There would be a lot more dignity for those passing away if they are given a private room to spend their remaining time with their families without the disruption of other patients in a four-bed ward.

Our health care system is designed to provide acute and complex care to patients who will, with that care, improve and get better. There is no system to deliver end-of-life care within our current hospital environment. Cowichan Hospice House will deliver that care.

Please donate today to help us improve hospice care in the Cowichan Valley.

Dontate Now